Bookin' It

I love reading all kinds of books to draw inspiration, get ideas, escape reality, and enter another world. I'm an artist so when I read books, my imagination and creativity really get working and I come up with lots of new creative ideas.

Brown Bear, Brown Bear, What Do You See?

Brown Bear, Brown Bear, What Do You See? - Bill Martin Jr., Eric Carle

Who didn't love this book as a child?  Its very engaging for kindergarten children, holding their attention with vivid colors, animals, and easy to understand text.  I would use this book as a reading circle read aloud.  I would read the book aloud to my kindergarten class and lead an activity in colors and sequencing.

13 Monsters Who Should Be Avoided

13 Monsters Who Should Be Avoided - Kevin Shortsleeve

This book was a very pleasant surprise.  I found it for a deal, but it turned out to be very entertaining and clever.  13 Monsters Who Should Be Avoided leaves out the monsters we have all heard of.  Its a poem explaining details and precautions of 13 silly monsters, along with detailed and whimsical illustrations.  Grades 1-3 would really enjoy this book.  This book would be a great addition to Autumn fiction lessons.  I would bring this book to supplement poetry lessons as a read-aloud, particularly during Halloween.

The Girl Who Loved Wild Horses

The Girl Who Loved Wild Horses - Paul Goble

I loved this book when I was a child, and it's still great. It tells the story of a Native American girl who loved wild horses. When the herd living near her tribe flees in fright from a storm, she jumps on the back of one and is carried far away from her tribe. She is seen later, living as one among the wild horses. Tailored for students in 4th and 5th grades, this book makes a great addition to fiction lessons. I would read this book aloud to the class to supplement cultural fiction and native american mythology lessons.

The Girl Who Loved Wild Horses

The Girl Who Loved Wild Horses - Paul Goble

I loved this book when I was a child, and it's still great.  It tells the story of a Native American girl who loved wild horses.  When the herd living near her tribe flees in fright from a storm, she jumps on the back of one and is carried far away from her tribe.  She is seen later, living as one among the wild horses.  Tailored for students in 4th and 5th grades, this book makes a great addition to fiction lessons.  I would read this book aloud to the class to supplement cultural fiction and native american mythology lessons.  

Chicka Chicka Boom Boom

Chicka Chicka Boom Boom - Bill Martin Jr., John Archambault, Lois Ehlert

No childhood is complete without this super-fun book.  Chicka Chicka Boom Boom is an adorable rhyming story about letters of the alphabet climbing a tree.  Intended for children in kindergarten and 1st grades, This book is great for when learning about the alphabet.  I would read this story aloud to assist in teaching letters of the alphabet and their sounds.

Chicka Chicka Boom Boom

Chicka Chicka Boom Boom - Bill Martin Jr., John Archambault, Lois Ehlert

No childhood is complete without this super-fun book.  Chicka Chicka Boom Boom is an adorable rhyming story about letters of the alphabet climbing a tree.  Intended for children in kindergarten and 1st grades, This book is great for when learning about the alphabet.  I would read this story aloud to assist in teaching letters of the alphabet and their sounds.

You Are My Work of Art

You Are My Work of Art - Sue DiCicco

I know its more of a parent-child book, but this book is so sweet.  Kindergarten students will love this book about how they are the greatest work of art.  I would add this book to my kindergarten introduction to art.  When reading this book aloud to my class, I would give them copies of the accompanying works of art and let them guess which one will be referenced on each page.

The Grouchy Caterpillar

The Grouchy Ladybug - Eric Carle

Eric Carle tells another valuable story with stunning illustrations in The Grouchy Ladybug.  We are told the story of a grouchy ladybug that challenges creatures much larger in size.  Kindergarteners and 2nd graders will be delighted with this book.  This book would help teach size relations, as well as social relationships and moods.  I would definitely use his book as a read aloud and have students refer to pages in the book when introducing differences in size.  

Who Put The B in Ballyhoo?

Who Put the B in the Ballyhoo? - Carlyn Beccia

This beautiful book provides terms and facts about the circus in alphabetical order, camouflaged by vivid illustrations and whimsical rhymes.  Fourth graders will be whisked away with the traveling circus when reading this book.  This book would be a great addition to any nonfiction lesson. I would use this book to introduce students to research and learning how to seek information through text.  

Canterbury Tales

Chancer's Canterbury Tales Retold And Illustrated by Marcia Williams - Marcia Williams, Geoffrey Chaucer

Chancer's Canterbury Tales have always been classics.  This version just made them a little more fun for me.  I love the mid-evil, and hilarious collection of the 9 tales, along with the comic-style illustrations.  Students in 5th and 6th grades will get the most from this selection.  This book works well in fiction lessons.  I would use this book during fiction lessons in studying differences in characters.  The 9 tales with the 9 different characters gives a wonderful study in character differences, elements, and dynamics.

My Teacher is a Monster!

My Teacher Is a Monster! (No, I Am Not.) - Peter Brown

I love this book. It's so simple and so cute! It is about a little boy who believes his not-so-fun teacher must be a monster. But then he interacts with her outside of school and realizes that the person he sees in the classroom isn't all of who she is.  Students in 1st and 2nd grades will love this adorable book (and some will relate to it)!.  This book would work wonderfully alone as a read-aloud for emergent readers.  I would use the book as a read-aloud, and them introducing class discussion by asking students if they have been in similar situations.  The story will teach a valuable lesson about not jumping to conclusions and judging people before really knowing them.  There's a great lesson in there for every age!

Peter Pan

Peter Pan - J.M. Barrie

Peter Pan is a classic, and one of my favorite stories.  I always loved the thought of flying with Peter Pan to Neverland and staying a child forever.  Students in the 5th and 6th grades would be the best audience for this book.  Peter Pan would work well in fiction lessons.  I would read the book over the course of a few weeks and have students identify story elements,  and practice creative writing by having students write a story from their perspective if they were "lost boys."

Teammates

Teammates - Peter Golenbock, Paul Bacon

Teammates tells the story of when Jackie Robinson became the first black Major League baseball player, and how Pee Wee Reese took a stand and proudly called Jackie his teammate.  This book is best suited for 3rd-5th grades.  The book would lend itself perfectly to lessons on nonfiction, as well as teaching about equality and standing up for what is right.  I would read this book to the class the day following the fiction lesson using The Bat Boy and His Violin.  The two books take place during the same time frame, and both are surrounded by the historical events of the time.  This would make a great lesson in comparing and contrasting fiction and nonfiction.

All Over Alabama

All Over Alabama - Laurie Parker

This book is so cute!  It follows a family of frogs living in Alabama.  Readers learn about all the family members living all over the state.  Not just a few, the book mentions over 360 Alabama cities, towns, and communities.  All Over Alabama is perfect for teaching 3rd through 5th graders social studies lessons specifically about their state.  i would give students a large state map to fill in throughout the story.  I would read a page or two each day, stopping so that students can fill in the places mentioned.  This book is a fun way to integrate reading and social studies.

The Very Hungry Caterpillar

The Very Hungry Caterpillar - Eric Carle

The Very Hungry Caterpillar is an absolute MUST for all children.  I have always loved this book!  Bright and beautiful illustrations animate the story of a caterpillar that eats his way right through the book on its way to becoming a butterfly.  This book is perfect for students in kindergarten up to 2nd grade.  It could be used as a stand-alone read aloud for the whole class, or to help introduce numbers and simple math.  I would have my students make and color their own caterpillars.  I would like to make these caterpillars into flip-books, with each segment of the body opening up to show each of the foods and amounts the caterpillar in the book ate (one apple, two pears, three plums, and so on).  The book and an activity like this one would be a great tool for teaching young children about numbers and counting.

The Bat Boy and His Violin

The Bat Boy and His Violin - Gavin Curtis, E.B. Lewis

This book really is great for introducing children to historical fiction.  It tells the story of a young boy who would rather play beautiful music than act as the bat boy for his father's baseball team in the Negro National League in the 1940's.  This book is great for 3rd and 4th grade classes.  I would use this book when teaching historical fiction.  I would use it in coordination with another book, Teammates by Peter Golenbock, which tells the true story of Jackie Robinson and the integration of professional baseball.  Both stories took place during the same time period and with the same historical events taking place.  Together, these stories create a very clear representation of fiction and nonfiction in the same setting.  

Currently reading

The Arabian Nights: Tales from a Thousand and One Nights
A.S. Byatt, Richard Francis Burton, Anonymous